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threads:chris:elves

On Elves in Fiction

Elves are never really the “bad guys” in fiction, but they are an unattainable goal for man to aspire to–not villains for their deeds but rather villains for their position above man. A good reoccurring theme is Elves being afraid of humanity's rise.

The Age of Man, a time without magic, a time of mortality, this is what the elves in LotR are fleeing from. In 40k the Eldar look at the Mon-keigh (slur for humans) with disdain, as upstarts with no business being as powerful or advanced as they are.

The Aldmeri in Elder Scrolls, a word in their own language meaning “first ones” or “first folk,” are incredibly offended by the notion of a simple man, Talos, becoming a God. To such an extent that their first order of business is to get the Empire to ban Talos worship.

This isn't malicious, not from any of their perspectives. It's trying to maintain a status quo, a state of being that inherently chaotic beings like humans dismantle just by merit of their existence. I think Angels are very similar, as the Abrahamic God's firstborn children.

There are stories, particularly Paradise Lost, that characterize the (fallen) angels as being abhorred by God's preference for humanity, when they–the divine, the immortal, the powerful, are surely superior in every way. But Elves and Angels both live stagnant lives. With their immortality nothing changes, nothing happens. The end of history, an existence that they've grown comfortable with. But men, with their short lives, have a burning fire to change the world, change the nature of reality.

If elves were real, humans would be the villains in their fiction. Creatures with very little concept of the future, living in the moment, altering things that have existed since time immemorial, simply because they can, and this is why those same elves strike out against us or otherwise choose not to even associate with us in OUR fiction. Their timeless existence simply cannot co-exist with the erratic, unpredictable nature of human beings.

Despite their best efforts, every elven society in fiction is long past their golden age. They are in a state of decay, fighting a futile battle against entropy. Gnashing their teeth while they're backed into a corner by the growth of man.

What they don't understand, and I think it's one of the more tragic things in fiction, is that we're the cure to all their problems. Entropy over the scale of a human lifespan is basically non-existent. We breathe life into worlds in metaphorical hospice care.

That's why we're (the) Gods' favourite children, and even with the Elves' labourious endeavours, we will eventually prevail and surpass them. It's fate, as was divinely ordained. The chemotherapy against the cancer that is stagnation and entropy. If elves were real, humans would be the villains in their fiction. Creatures with very little concept of the future, living in the moment, altering things that have existed since time immemorial, simply because they can, and this is why those same elves strike out against us or otherwise choose not to even associate with us in OUR fiction. Their timeless existence simply cannot co-exist with the erratic, unpredictable nature of human beings.

Despite their best efforts, every elven society in fiction is long past their golden age. They are in a state of decay, fighting a futile battle against entropy. Gnashing their teeth while they're backed into a corner by the growth of man.

What they don't understand, and I think it's one of the more tragic things in fiction, is that we're the cure to all their problems. Entropy over the scale of a human lifespan is basically non-existent. We breathe life into worlds in metaphorical hospice care.

That's why we're (the) Gods' favourite children, and even with the Elves' labourious endeavours, we will eventually prevail and surpass them. It's fate, as was divinely ordained. The chemotherapy against the cancer that is stagnation and entropy.

threads/chris/elves.txt · Last modified: 2021/02/26 05:02 by deluge